Just 2 days ago, my PC was infected with a virus/malware called Live Security Platinum.  I don’t even have idea how and when it got installed, the only time I heard about the virus is from my wife is, “hey, there is this annoying prompt about virus in your laptop that just won’t go way!”  Well, maybe you got the hint how my laptop got the virus 😉

This ‘scareware’ installs itself and make it look like an antivirus software; and it will scan your PC and of course returned with lots of virus….and finally presented you with a screen to pay for the Anti Virus software.  This is a tough virus to kill for beginner because it will block you from launching .exe file (including notepad), and so you cannot launch anti-virus software, Firefox, Chrome.  Fortunately, IE is not affected (I don’t know why).  If you are unfortunately infected by Live Security Platinum, please use this link to follow the step by step procedure to remove it:

Remove Live Security Platinum (Uninstall Guide)

I fixed mine using the link above.  There are a couple of other websites that provide the fix, you can search “Live Security Platinum” using Google.  If you cannot access the internet, try using mobile.  It looks like a lot of steps but it is very easy to follow. 

So what has the virus got to do with this post?  Nothing! Except it is preventing me from writing this post ha!  Sorry for the rambling, I just hope it can help you if you happen to be one of my readers.

*****

OK now let’s go to the ‘correct’ article….

Just last Friday, I read about Jeremy Lin departs New York Knicks for the Houston Rockets.  I normally don’t follow basketball news, but I read about Jeremy Lin every time he appears in the news.  Knicks fans have hoped that Lin will stay because that’s how ‘Linsainity’ started. 

Again, I don’t play basketball and ain’t no NBA fans, so this post is not about analyzing whether he should stay or go, but this whole story about Jeremy Lin is too inspiring to pass up.  Read on…

In case you have not heard of him (where have you been?), Jeremy Lin has taken the basketball world by storm with his individual and team’s successes. 

The Harvard University-educated Lin has sold more jerseys than any other player in the National Basketball Association (NBA) since Feb 4.  And since the birth of Linsanity, the term attached to the hoopla surrounding the 23-year-old, Lin has signed sponsorship agreements with Taiwan-based Maxxis International, a tire manufacturer, and Acer, the fourth largest computer maker, and most recently Coca-Cola.  The demand for Lin in Asia prompted broadcaster in China to alter their schedules, adding Knicks game whenever possible.  The basketballer has become the No. 1 search term on Baidu, China’s version of Google.

Before you say “wow, he is so lucky!”….. Let me show you ‘behind the scene’ of Jeremy Lin’s rise to Linsanity….

When Jeremy Lin was in the eighth grade, the teenager known on basketball courts around the region as “Little Jeremy” because he was, well, little.  He told his pastor at the Chinese Church in Christ in nearby Mountain View that he someday would become an NBA player.  In the basketball world that’s dominated by African American, and without the ‘right’ height of Yao Ming of 2.29m (Jeremy Lin is just 1.91m), it goes unnoticed that he has prepared by practicing enough times, hitting the gym hard, and ready to take on the role of leading a then struggling New York Knicks team.

Thus began one of the unlikeliest stories in NBA history, perhaps in the history of sports.

What is unknown to most people is that how hard Jeremy Lin has worked to get to this point.  Lin was a star player at Palo Alto High School but still too small to earn a scholarship to a major college program, so he didn’t get into any of his preferred colleges and ended up at Harvard – not exactly a basketball powerhouse, played well there by Ivy League standards but was undrafted by the NBA, tried out in the summer league, earned some offers to sit at the end of the bench, and the undrafted Lin was cut by two teams before joining the struggling Knicks.

When The New York Knicks picked him up going into last season and until Feb 2012, he was virtually unknown, even to the New York fans, and sitting on the end of the bench. Lin was sleeping on his brother’s couch, not getting playing time and was probably facing the end of his very short basketball career.

Due to a few key injuries on the Knicks, Lin got his shot. Their desperate coach put him in 9 games. And this unwanted, undrafted, twice cut, bench-warmer has turned the world upside-down. The Knicks are 8-1 in those 9 games and Lin has been phenomenal, LINSANITY!

Jeremy Lin has since taken the NBA by storm. The New York Knicks point guard has totaled 109 points in his first four NBA starts. He has more points than the record numbers set by legendary players like Shaquille O’Neal, Allen Iverson and Michael Jordan, tops since the NBA and ABA merger in 1976. He went from the last man on the Knicks roster to the frontman of the entire lineup, getting more respect on the court than superstar teammates Carmelo Anthony and Amar’e Stoudemire.

But what goes missing here is the fact that how hard Jeremy Lin has worked to get to this point. It goes unnoticed that the only reason why he was able to assume this role from the bench is because he was ready to take on the role of leading a struggling team. He was prepared to win games by practicing enough to be prepared. He prepared to be strong enough to fight off defenders by hitting the gym hard. He prepared to get the open look during the game by working on his footwork enough times. He prepared to drive by defenders by working on his ball-handling endlessly. He prepared to hit the game winning by shooting hundreds of times a game with the right arc. Bottom line: Jeremy Lin was READY for this. This is not an underdog story. This is not a Cinderella story. Because underdogs shine on one night, not multiple nights. Underdogs defy odds. Jeremy Lin pushed the odds in his favor every time he woke up at 6 am to hit the gym. He increased his chances of winning with every shot he took, every squat he did, every sprint he ran. Jeremy Lin is no underdog. He is the real deal.

 

 John Berman translates Jeremy Lin’s winning performance for everyone else:

Believe in your dreams, even if no one else does

 

In an interviewed by ESPN, when asked: How badly do you want to win?

To which Lin replied, “You don’t have to wait for the coach to put you in! You’re already in the lineup. The question is whether you will give it your all. How hard are you willing to practice? How seriously will you take the game? What level of intensity, or even desperation, will you bring? How badly do you want to win?”

If you are struggling or possibly even close to calling it quits, take a few minutes to read the Jeremy Lin story below, adapted from Wikipedia. He has risen from nowhere to celebrity, prominence and star status.

 

Jeremy Shu-How Lin 林书豪 (born August 23, 1988) is an American professional basketball player with the New York Knicks of the National Basketball Association (NBA).

After receiving no athletic scholarship offers out of high school and being undrafted out of college, the 2010 Harvard University graduate reached a partially guaranteed contract deal later that year with his hometown Golden State Warriors.  After that, he was waived by the Warriors and the Houston Rockets the following preseason before joining the Knicks early in the 2011–12 season.

Lin was assigned to the NBA Development League (D-League) and play sparingly. In February 2012, he led a winning streak by New York while being promoted to the starting lineup, which generated a global following known as Linsanity. Lin is one of the few Asian Americans in NBA history, and the first American player in the league to be of Chinese or Taiwanese descent.

College Careers

Lin sent his résumé and a DVD of highlights of his high school basketball career to all the Ivy League schools, University of California, Berkeley, and his dream schools Stanford and University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). The Pac-10 schools wanted him to walk-on, rather than be actively recruited or offered a sports scholarship. Harvard and Brown were the only teams that guaranteed him a spot on their basketball teams, but Ivy League schools do not offer athletic scholarships.

Rex Walters, University of San Francisco men’s basketball coach and a retired NBA player said “most colleges start recruiting a guy in the first five minutes they see him because he runs really fast, jumps really high, does the quick, easy thing to evaluate”, which is not what Lin thought about himself – “I just think in order for someone to understand my game, they have to watch me more than once, because I’m not going to do anything that’s extra flashy or freakishly athletic.”

In July 2005, then-Harvard assistant coach Bill Holden saw that Lin was 6 feet 3 inches (1.91 m), which fit the physical attributes he was seeking, and he had a 4.2 grade point average in high school, which fit Harvard’s academic standards. However, Holden was not initially impressed with Lin’s on-court abilities, and told Lin’s high school basketball coach, Peter Diepenbrock, that Lin was a “Division III player”. Later that week, Holden saw Lin playing in a much more competitive game, driving to the basket at every opportunity with the “instincts of a killer”. Lin became a priority for Holden.

A Harvard coach remembered Lin in his freshman season as “the [physically] weakest guy on the team”, but in his sophomore season (2007–08), Lin averaged 12.6 points and was named All-Ivy League Second Team.  But by his junior year during`the 2008–09 season, his game improved and was a consensus selection for All-Ivy League First Team.  In his senior year (2009–10), Lin averaged 16.4 points, and was again a unanimous selection for All-Ivy League First Team.

Professional Career

On July 21, 2010, Lin signed a two-year deal with his hometown Warriors, his favorite team growing up. Lin’s deal was partially guaranteed for 2010–11, and the Warriors held a team option for the second season.  The deal included a first-year salary of close 4o $500,000 with more than half of it guaranteed. Lin said the counteroffers from the three other teams were higher, but he wanted to play for the Warriors.

The Warriors held a press conference for Lin after his signing, with national media in attendance. “It was surprising to see that … for an undrafted rookie,” said then-Warriors coach Keith Smart.

The San Francisco Bay Area, with its large Asian-American population, celebrated his arrival.  He became the first American of Chinese or Taiwanese descent to play in the NBA.  Lin received the loudest ovation of the night in the Warriors’ home exhibition opener at Oracle Arena when he entered the game in the fourth quarter. The crowd had started chanting for him in the third quarter and cheered whenever he touched the ball. “That really touched me. It’s something I’ll remember forever,” Lin said.

Lin noticed the expectations that followed him and warned, “I won’t be an All-Star this year.”  He was appreciative of the support, especially from the Asian-American community, but he also preferred concentrating on his play without all the attention when he had not “proven anything to anybody.”

Ex-Warrior coach Smart saw that Lin was skilled at getting to the paint, but needed to learn to pass because, he said, Lin “couldn’t shoot the ball at all”. The coach also noticed that the player always arrived early for practice and left late. Lin studied and rehearsed Steve Nash and other top point guards’ pick-and-roll plays.

Lin received little playing time during the season with two dominant ball-handling guards, Curry and Monta Ellis, starring for the Warriors.

The Warriors saw Lin as a potential backup for Curry.  Joe Lacob (Warrior’s owner) said the team received more than one trade offer for Lin while he was in the D-League, but he was happy with Lin’s progress as an undrafted free agent. “He’s a minimum, inexpensive asset. You need to look at him as a developing`asset. Is he going to be a superstar? No.”  

In September 2011, Lin played a few games for the Chinese Basketball Association (CBA) club Dongguan Leopards at the ABA Club Championship in Guangzhou, China, where he was named the MVP of the tournament.  Shanghai Sharks president and former NBA star Yao Ming also tried, unsuccessfully, to sign Lin for the upcoming CBA season; Lin explained that as someone still under contract with the Golden State Warriors, he could not play in the CBA as the league would only admit NBA free agent3.

Lin worked to improve his jump shot during the offseason by abandoning the shooting form he had used since the eighth grade. He also increased his strength, doubling the weight he could squat (from 110 pounds (50 kg) to 231 (105)) and almost tripling the number of pull-ups that he could do (from 12 to 30).  He increased his body weight from 200 pounds (91 kg) to 212 (96)—including 15 pounds (6.8 kg) of muscle—added 3.5 inches (8.9 cm) to his standing vertical jump and 6 inches (15 cm) to his running vertical jump, and improved his lateral quickness by 32 percent.  

Due to the lockout, he never got a chance to workout for new Warriors coach Mark Jackson.  On the first day of training camp on December 9, 2011, the Warriors waived Lin. He was a favorite of Lacob, but the Warriors were freeing up salary cap space to make an offer to restricted free agent center DeAndre Jordan;  Lin was due to make nearly $800,000 that would have become fully guaranteed on February 10, 2012. The San Francisco Chronicle said Lin would have had trouble beating out rookie guard Charles Jenkins.

New York Knicks (2011–2012 Jul)

The New York Knicks claimed Lin off waivers on December 27 to be a backup behind Toney Douglas and Mike Bibby after an injury to guard Iman Shumpert; recently-signed guard Baron Davis was also injured and weeks away from playing.  He becomes a restricted free agent at the end of the season.

Because of the lockout coaches had little opportunity to see Lin’s play, and placed him fourth on the point guard depth chart. Lin said he was “competing for a backup spot, and people see me as the 12th to 15th guy on the roster. It’s a numbers game”, and continued to arrive first at practice, leave last, intensely study game film, and work with coaches to improve his footwork and judgement.

He made his season debut on the road against the Warriors, where he was warmly cheered in his return to Oracle Arena.  On January 17, 2012, Lin was assigned to the Erie BayHawks of the D-League.  On January 20, he had a triple-double with 28 points, 11 rebounds, and 12 assists in the BayHawks’ 122–113 victory over the Maine Red Claws. Lin was recalled by the Knicks three days later, but so feared being cut again that he asked a chaplain at a pregame prayer service to pray for him.  If released again, Lin considered playing in Europe, returning to the D-league, or taking a break with a non-basketball job.

On January 28, Davis suffered a setback that postponed his Knicks debut.  Then New York considered releasing Lin before his contract became guaranteed on February 10 so they could sign a new player. However, after the Knicks squandered a fourth quarter lead in a February 3 loss to the Boston Celtics, coach Mike D’Antoni decided to give Lin a chance to play due to “desperation”, according to experts. “He got lucky because we were playing so bad,” said D’Antoni.  Lin had played only 55 minutes through the Knicks’ first 23 games, but he would unexpectedly lead a turnaround of an 8–15 team that had lost 11 of its last 13 games.

On February 4, Lin outplayed All-Star guard Deron Williams in a 99–92 Knicks victory over the New Jersey Nets.

In the subsequent game against the Utah Jazz, Lin made his first career start playing without stars Anthony, who left the game due to injury, and Amare Stoudemire, whose older brother had died. Lin had 28 points and eight assists in the Knicks’ 99–88 win.  

In a 107–93 Knicks won over the Washington Wizards.  On February 10, Lin scored a new career-high 38 points leading the Knicks in their 92–85 victory over the Los Angeles Lakers. He outscored the Lakers’ Kobe Bryant, who had 34 points.  

Lin went on to have victories over the Minnesota Timberwolves, Toronto Raptors, Sacramento Kings.

Lin became the first NBA player to score at least 20 points and have seven assists in each of his first five starts.Lin scored 89, 109, and 136 points in his first three, four, and five career starts, respectively, all three of which are the most by any player since the merger between the American Basketball Association (ABA) and the NBA in 1976–77.

The winning streak ended in an 89–85 loss to the New Orleans Hornets.

Racial Issues

Basketball coach Diepenbrock said that people without meaning any harm assume since Lin is Asian that he is not a basketball player. The first time Lin went to a Pro-Am game in Kezar Pavilion in San Francisco someone there informed him: “Sorry, sir, there’s no volleyball here tonight. It’s basketball.”  NBA player Rex Walter remarked, “People who don’t think stereotypes exist are crazy. If [Lin’s] white, he’s either a good shooter or heady. If he’s Asian, he’s good at math. We’re not taking him.”

During Lin’s college career, fewer than 0.5% of men’s Division 1 basketball players were Asian-American.  Lin has regularly heard bigoted jeers at games such as “Wonton soup”, “Sweet and sour pork”, “Open your eyes!”, “Go back to China”, “Orchestra is on the other side of campus”, or pseudo-Chinese gibberish.

Lin says this occurred at most if not all Ivy League gyms. He does not react to it. “I expect it, I’m used to it, it is what it is,” says Lin.  The heckling came mostly from opposing fans and not as much from players.  According to Harvard teammate Oliver McNally, a fellow Ivy League player once called Lin the ethnic slur chink.

Lin considers himself a basketball player more than just an Asian American. He understands that there have not been many Asians in the NBA. “Maybe I can help break the stereotype,” said Lin.  Prior to the 2010–11 NBA season, Americans of Asian descent who played in the NBA included Wataru Misaka, Raymond Townsend, Corey Gaines, Rex Walters, and Robert Swift.  “I don’t look Japanese,” Walters said, referring to his mother’s ethnicity. “When they see [Lin], it’s an Asian-American”.

Boxer Floyd Mayweather, Jr. wrote on his Twitter page, “Jeremy Lin is a good player but all the hype is because he’s Asian. Black players do what he does every night and don’t get the same praise.”   NBCNewYork.com in response to Mayweather noted that “no one of any skin color in the history of basketball has done in their first four starts what Lin pulled off for the Knicks last week.”

“Linsanity”

After he became a starter for the Knicks, the Associated Press called Lin “the most surprising story in the NBA”.  Bloomberg News wrote that Lin “has already become the most famous [Asian American NBA player]”. Knicks fans developed nicknames for him along with a new lexicon inspired by his name, Lin.

Most popular was the word Linsanity, the excitement over the unheralded Lin.  Time.com ran an article titled, “It’s Official: Linsanity Is for Real”.  Hall of Fame player Magic Johnson said, “The excitement [Lin] has caused in [Madison Square] Garden, man, I hadn’t seen that in a long time.”

He appeared on the cover of Sports Illustrated with the headline “Against All Odds”, which the Times called “the greatest tribute”. He also made the cover of Time in Asia; Forbes wrote, “Congratulations Jeremy. You have now made the cover of Time the same number of times as Michael Jordan. Linsanity reigns on.” Lin’s story was also on the front-page of many Taipei newspapers. “I haven’t done a computation, but it’s fair to say that no player has created the interest and the frenzy in this short period of time, in any sport, that I’m aware of like Jeremy Lin has,” said NBA commissioner David Stern.

The Knicks’ success due to Lin’s play reportedly contributed to the end of a dispute which had for 48 days prevented Time Warner Cable customers from watching Knicks games and other MSG Network programs.  The team quickly began selling replicas of Lin’s No. 17 jerseys and t-shirts, and the sales and traffic for its online store increased more than 3,000%; Lin has had the best-selling jersey in the NBA since February 4, 2012. Both Nike and Adidas introduced Lin-related athletic apparel, and expected that his fame would help sales in China.

Within three weeks of his first game as a starter, at least seven e-books were being published on Lin, and the Global Language Monitor declared that Linsanity had met its criteria to be considered an English-language word.  He appeared on a second consecutive Sports Illustrated cover, the first New York-based team athlete and the third NBA player in the magazine’s history, after Jordan and Dirk Nowitzki.

 An airline advertised “Linsanely low prices”, bids for his rookie card exceeded $21,000 on eBay.

Foreign Policy speculated on his potential impact on Sino-American relations, and Jack and Suzy Welch wrote that Lin’s rise was a lesson to business leaders to not let bureaucracy stifle unproven talent. Despite his sudden fame Sacramento Kings coach Keith Smart stated, “I knew [Lin] before he was Linmania. He’s still the same humble guy. The guy has not changed a bit, which is real special for a young man.”

 

This video clip shows a day in the life of Jeremy Lin during his short time with the Golden State Warriors.  This is inspiring because it shows how hard he has worked to get to where he is and how he has literally proved everyone wrong.

Take a look at the video below that shares his story, his emergence, and the preparation behind the scenes that elevated him into an elite athlete.

So everyone now agrees how good a player Jeremy Lin is, yet, very few talks about how well-deserved these accolades are.   Also, just in case if you are still thinking that he is “lucky”, I think we could all learn from Jeremy Lin; and regardless of where you think you sit in this world, you can too.

Lessons we can learn from Jeremy Lin

1. You’ve got to believe in yourself, even when no one else does.

I don’t want to rehash the materials but below are some of the instances to highlight when Lin could have quitted if his belief wavers.

  • Ex-Warrior coach Smart remarked that Lin “couldn’t shoot the ball at all”.
  • The Pac-10 schools wanted him to walk-on, rather than be actively recruited or offered a sports scholarship.
  • Rex Walters, University of San Francisco men’s basketball coach and a retired NBA player said “most colleges start recruiting a guy in the first five minutes they see him because he runs really fast, jumps really high, does the quick, easy thing to evaluate”, which is not what Lin thought about himself.
  • “Jeremy was so small and not very strong,” his basketball coach at Paly, Peter Diepenbrock, said. “You couldn’t blame the coaches who came to see him play. Not even Harvard was that interested.”
  • Joe Lacob (Warrior’s owner) said, “He’s a minimum, inexpensive asset. You need to look at him as a developing asset. Is he going to be a superstar? No.” 
  • Warriors waived Lin. He was a favorite of Lacob, but the Warriors were freeing up salary cap space to make an offer to restricted free agent center DeAndre Jordan;  Lin was due to make nearly $800,000 that would have become fully guaranteed on February 10, 2012
  •  The San Francisco Chronicle said Lin would have had trouble beating out rookie guard Charles Jenkins.
  • Then-Harvard assistant coach Bill Holden was not initially impressed with Lin’s on-court abilities, and told Lin’s high school basketball coach, Peter Diepenbrock, that Lin was a “Division III player”.
  • NY Knicks placed him fourth on the point guard depth chart.
  • Basketball coach Diepenbrock said that people without meaning any harm assume since Lin is Asian that he is not a basketball player. The first time Lin went to a Pro-Am game in Kezar Pavilion in San Francisco someone there informed him: “Sorry, sir, there’s no volleyball here tonight. It’s basketball.”

 

2. Persistence exemplified. 

  • Jeremy Lin flew under the radar for so long, and he persisted.  He’d already been cut by two other NBA teams before joining the Knicks this year. He was sent by the Knicks to play for their D-League team.  He persisted in Knicks even when he was not given chance to play.
  • Despite being cut by two teams, Lin always arrived early for practice and left late.  And even with more disappointment, he studied and rehearsed Steve Nash and other top point guards’ pick-and-roll plays.
  • Then New York considered releasing Lin before his contract became guaranteed on February 10 so they could sign a new player. However, after the Knicks squandered a fourth quarter lead in a February 3 loss to the Boston Celtics, coach Mike D’Antoni decided to give Lin a chance to play due to “desperation”, and this is when his persistence pays off handsomely

 

3.  Seize the opportunity, and be prepared

  • Lin got to start for the Knicks because they needed him after losing 11 of 13 games .  Carmelo Anthony was injured. Amare Stoudemire couldn’t play because of brother’s death. Lin could have squandered the opportunity and we would never have noticed or know Lin. But he made the most of it.
  • You never know when opportunities are going to arise in life. Often, they’re when you least expect them. One has to realize that the 8-1 record has been largely without the team’s two biggest stars.  But it is equally important to be prepared when opportunity shows up.  Don’t fritter them away.

 

4. Positive mindset

  • Lin was largely a bench-warmer, and given little chance to play in Knicks; to which Lin said he was “competing for a backup spot, and people see me as the 12th to 15th guy on the roster. It’s a numbers game”, and continued to arrive first at practice, leave last, intensely study game film, and work with coaches to improve his footwork and judgement.
  • Instead of feeling he was not good enough to play in the NBA, Lin take it as learning and getting playing time in the D-League that he would not have received with the Warriors.

 

More actions from Lincredible Linsanity, are you All Lin? 😉

 

Today, not only had Jeremy Lin become one of the most recognizable basketball players in the world, but he was named as one of the 100 most influential people in the world by Time magazine and as one of the eight most influential Chinese-Americans by Vivid, a Chinese magazine.

Lin became the new point guard for the Rockets last week.  Ironically, Rockets was one of the teams that cut him seven months ago.  

Lin was due to make nearly $800,000 when Warriors waived him.  After getting cut by the Warriors and the Rockets the following season, he got an annual salary of $762,195 from the Knicks in 2011-12.  Now, Lin, 23, is with Rocket’s for the salary of $25.1 million for three years. 

OK I’m coming to an end for this Linderella story, time for me to kick myself in the butt again!

What is stopping you from elevating your ‘game’ in life? It’s the land of the free and the home of the brave. Take your shot! I hope you are inspired by Linsanity, and as Linsane as it sounds, yes, you can remake your identity.  Make it happen!

 

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Reference:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jeremy_Lin

 

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